Introduction to Application of Numbers

Post Reply
CXB
Posts: 98
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:39 pm

Introduction to Application of Numbers

Post by CXB »

Help :crazy:

I have googled fractions and I still dont have a scooby do on how to do Fractions.

One of the questions is 4/5+1/3x3/5 where do I start also (3/5+1/3)x5/7 once again where do I start. I never mastered these at school.

Look forward to hearing from someone :thumbup:

Clare

Yvonne Otter
Head of level 2 and GCSE equivalences
Posts: 70
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 10:50 pm

Re: Introduction to Application of Numbers

Post by Yvonne Otter »

Hi Clare,

If we look at similar examples then this might help you with the assessment questions.

Let's consider 1/3 + 3/4 x 1/5

First we use BIDMAS to tell us where to start. We know that Multiplication is carried out before addition so we would carry out 3/4 x 1/5 first. With Multiplication the process is quite straightforward ( we don't need to worry about a common denominator or anything). We just multiply the two numerators together to give a new numerator and the two denominators together to give a new denominator.

So 3/4 x 1/5 = 3/20

Now we need to do the rest of it which is now

1/3 + 3/20

When we are adding (or subtracting) then we need the denominators to be the same. So we look for the number that 3 and 20 will both go into (60)

We change each fraction to its equivalent fraction with a denominator of 60

1/3 = 20/60 (top and bottom numbers x 20) and 3/20 = 9/60 (top and bottom numbers x 3)

Now we have 20/60 + 9/60 = 29/60 (when we add or subtract fractions we work with the numerators only)

29/60 Is our answer

If we consider an example in the second format (1/3 + 3/4) x 1/5

This time BIDMAS tells us that we need to do the Brackets first

1/3 + 3/4 so we look for a number that 3 and 4 go into (12

1/3 = 4/12 and 3/4 = 9/12 (you can find more on equivalent fractions on bbc skillswise)

So 4/12 + 9/12 = 13/12 ( Don't worry about it being top heavy)

Now for the second part 13/12 x 1/5 = 13/60 (remember times the numerators together for the new numerator and the denominators together for the denominator)

So this time 13/60 is the answer.

Hopefully this helps you. Don't forget, your tutor will be able to help you too.

Yvonne

CXB
Posts: 98
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:39 pm

Re: Introduction to Application of Numbers

Post by CXB »

Hello there :D ,

I would like to thank you for your help on these two questions. It helped me and I have finally finished that assignment.

It was a tough one for me as math isnt my strength. I am going to submit my work over this weekend and I hope :pray: its what they were looking for.

Have a great weekend. No to crack on with the Maths project shoe sizes :thumbup:

Regards,

Clare

Post Reply

Return to “assessments”